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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
palestinian status at the u.n.; reading the fine print; tackling immigration reform and re-purposing digital data gathered during the campaign. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street tracked the ups and downs of the fiscal cliff drama in washington today. at one point, the dow jones industrial average was off more than 100 points. but stocks made up the ground after the president's talk of a deal by christmas. the dow ended with a gain of nearly 107 points to close at 12,985. the nasdaq rose 24 points to close well over 2,991. a moderate republican senator susan collins of maine voiced new concerns today about u.n. ambassador susan rice. it stemmed from rice's initial account, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by
best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was ful
with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy commercial area. a third bombing killed six people near a shrine in the city of karbala. a year-long inquiry into british media practices ended today with a call for new regulation. lord justice brian leveson led the investigation. it was triggered by a scandal ov
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
bank. the associated press reported the development one day after the u.n. general assembly recognized palestine as a non-member observer state, including gaza, the west bank and east jerusalem. the palestinians quickly condemned any new settlement building. chief negotiator saeb erekat accused israel of "defying the whole international community." in syria, internet access and most phone service was blocked for a second day. opposition activists blamed the regime. government officials insisted rebels were behind the outage. meanwhile, fighting continued in and around damascus, but government troops managed to reopen the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virginia. manning says his treatment there was so harsh, the charges should be dismissed. the military says
to account. >> brown: that was a view shared by u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, speaking at a climate conference in qatar. >> the country has a fundamental responsibility to keep this stockpile of chemical weapons in the safest way. i have warned that if in any case these should be used then there will be huge consequences and they should be accountable. >> brown: and as fears of chemical warfare grow, the humanitarian crisis has steadily worsened. more refugees streamed into turkey today, fleeing syrian air raids. >> brown: for more on the syrian chemical weapons threat i'm joined by leonard spector, a weapons and nonproliferation expert with the monterey institute of international studies. that can be hard to say. welcome back. the white house says it has increased concern the government might be prepared to use these weapons. what does that mean? what are they seeing? >> we don't know precisely what they're seeing. there are rumors that there is some sort of preparation for the chemicals that would be used in these weapons. there are preliminary steps that sometimes are taken. they
minister sergei lavrov and u.n. envoy lakdar brahimi who spoke to the press. >> we haven't taken any sensational decisions but i think we have agreed that the situation is bad and we have agreed that we must continue to work together to see how we can find creative ways of bringing this problem under control and hopefully starting to solve it. >> brown: all of this, amid rising fears that the syrian president might use chemical weapons against the rebels. in washington, defense secretary leon panetta joined a chorus of u.s. warnings. >> the intelligence that we have raises serious concerns that this is being considered. >> reporter: those concerns were echoed on capitol hill. >> if syrian tv is catching this news conference, there's been a tidal shift here to where military force will be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day. >> brown: but syria's deputy foreign minister, speaking on lebanese t.v., charged that if anyone is planning to use chemical warfare, it's the west. >> ( translated ): we have strong fear of the existence of a conspiracy to use
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)